Just Stop (O)rd(I)na(L)s: Protesters Block Internet Traffic, Throw Paint on Computer Screens to Demand End to Inscriptions

Just Stop (O)rd(I)na(L)s: Protesters Block Internet Traffic, Throw Paint on Computer Screens to Demand End to Inscriptions

Traditional transaction activists from Just Stop Ordinals have been gaining more visibility since a recent flurry of distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks aimed at blocking internet traffic to the Ordiscan website as well as some clever attempts to prevent the ability of inscription transactions from reaching the mempool.

Members of the largely anonymous activist group who believe inscriptions are spam which contribute to blockchain bloat that lead to higher transaction fees say their efforts are only getting started. Protesters posted images of their computer screens on X showing their browsers displaying the Ordiscan website with orange paint covering the screen, an homage to tactics used by Just Stop Oil protesters who throw paint on real life art to protest oil's contribution to Climate Change.

"High transaction fees disproportionately affect Bitcoin users in the Global South" one activist told The Bugle. "If poor people in places like El Salvador can't afford to use Bitcoin because NFT scammers are driving up fees, then Bitcoin has failed."

People attempting to view the Ordiscan website complained about slow load times and trouble accessing the site last week. Some consider Just Stop Ordinals activists to be a relatively mild nuisance but others warn that continued disruptions could be met with violence. "If I see one of those assholes in the streets, it's on site" said Nic Carter, a popular Ordinals respector.

Popular Canadian Bitcoin artist, MADEX, posted an inflammatory response to Carter's remarks last weekend, appearing to raise the stakes.

The Bugle will continue to follow and report on this developing story.